Beetroot and red onion tarte tatin

This glistening, deep-red tart would make a showy centrepiece for Sunday lunch, and is useful if you or those you cook for are vegan or trying it out for Veganuary. I made it the other evening for an omnivorous friend with high culinary standards, who gave it the thumbs up, so meat-eaters won’t be disappointed either.

There seem to be various approaches to caramelising the vegetables before finally baking them under their crust. I decided that baking the beetroot with olive oil and basalmic vinegar and cooking the onions on top of the stove gave the best combination of ease and deep flavour. If the beetroot you have are small you may need more than four and in this case, they will just need to be quartered or halved. Remember to choose a puff pastry that is vegan.

You will need a solid baking tin – don’t use a spring-form tin or you may end up with the juices firmly caramelised onto your oven. I used a 20cm round one, but a square pan would be absolutely fine if you have a dish or board the right shape to turn it out onto. And you use a rectangular tin a bit smaller than your piece of pastry then you won’t need to faff around cutting it to size (though you may need more beetroot and onions)! Note that you need to rest the tart for 10 minutes before serving, so build that if you timing is critical. This quantity feeds 3-4 people, depending on what side dishes (or other courses) you serve it with – you could, of course, easily scale it up to make a big tart for a crowd.

  • 3-4 medium beetroot
  • 4 tbsps rapeseed or olive oil
  • 1 tbsp basalmic vinegar
  • 3 red onions
  • 1 tsp soft brown sugar
  • half a pre-rolled sheet of puff pastry
  • handful of parsley (optional)

IMG_6062Unroll the sheet of puff pastry, upend the baking tin on it, and cut a piece 1 cm larger than the tin. I needed to roll the pastry a bit to get it to the right shape, and I should have allowed a bigger rim to tuck in (as you can see, it was not 1 cm larger than the tin). Re-wrap the pastry and put it back in the fridge in its bag. Line the baking tin with greaseproof paper. Heat the oven to 180°F fan/200°F/Gas 6.

Wash, trim and peel the beetroot (use rubber gloves if you want to avoid Lady Macbeth hands). Cut them into 6 or 8 wedges from top to tip and put them in a bowl (yes, it is worth the extra washing up!). Toss with about 2 tbsps oil, 1 tbsp basalmic vinegar, salt and pepper.

img_6063.jpgNow arrange the beetroot wedges on their sides in a circle around the edge of the tin, fitting them snugly together (mine could have been closer together) and fill the centre with a few of the smaller pieces. Put into the pre-warmed oven and cook for 30-40 minutes until a knife goes through them, remembering that they are going to get cooked a bit more later. If you have any beetroot left over (I did) just tip them into a separate baking pan, cover with foil and pop them in the oven at the same time. They will make a lovely beetroot salad with watercress, chicory and sliced orange.

img_6064.jpgPeel the onions and slice fairly finely. Heat the remaining 2 tbsps oil over a medium heat in a large frying pan with a lid.

Stir the onions regularly and when they start to soften add the 1 tsp brown sugar, season with salt and black pepper and put the lid on. Cook the onions slowly for a further 15 minutes, stirring once or twice, until they are meltingly soft and caramelising. Leave to cool – this makes it easier when you come to add the pastry. You can prepare everything a few hours ahead up to this point.

img_6065.jpgWhen the beetroot is ready spoon the onions over them, filling any gaps between the wedges to give a relatively smooth surface. Carefully unroll the pastry over the top and tuck the edges down over the filling.

Bake for 20-25 minutes until the pastry is nicely browned, turning the tin half way if your oven is like mine and browns the back half of the pastry more quickly. Take out of the oven and rest for 10 minutes – this allows the tart to settle and avoids you emptying scalding beetroot juice over your hands when you turn it out!

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Gently slide a spatula round the edge of the tart to loosen any sticky bits. Now firmly clamp your serving plate over the top of the tart, using a cloth as the tin will still be hot, and swiftly turn it over. The greaseproof paper will probably stay in the tin but if not just peel it off – it will have done its work of stopping the filling sticking to the tin. Sprinkle over some chopped parsley, if you wish. It really needs to be served with something green – broccoli is good or a watercress or rocket salad – and you could add new potatoes if you want to make it more substantial.

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2 thoughts on “Beetroot and red onion tarte tatin

  1. Speaking as the omnivorous friend, I went back for seconds and didn’t leave the chef much for her lunch the next day! Now to find a way to make amends …

    Liked by 1 person

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