Asian fish parcels

Lunch today was this simple yet special dish of fish with rice and pak choi. It tasted really zingy, fresh and light after all the rich festive food we’ve been indulging in over the last couple of weeks. It is probably the recipe we have used most from Lindsey Bareham’s excellent cookbook The Fish Store, which not only contains great recipes for fish, but also lots of her family’s other favourite dishes for chicken, lamb, vegetables and puddings – do treat yourself if you haven’t already got it.

Asian fish parcels served

This is a great recipe to have in your repertoire if your New Year’s resolutions include eating fish more regularly for a healthy diet. It works with any white fish – we usually use haddock or hake – and the foil parcels can be prepared ahead ready to pop into the oven 15 minutes or so before you want to eat, so it’s perfect for entertaining. With rice and pak choi already in the parcel with the fish, it is also really easy to serve – and as Lindsey Bareham points out, there is very little washing up!

Irene tends to cook this for us, and has adapted the original recipe, blanching the pak choi first to bring out its flavour, adding some fresh chilli and tweaking the seasonings. Like her mother, she follows the Indonesian tradition of not salting the rice, so that it acts as a plain foil to the strong flavours of the sauce served with it. If you don’t have ketjap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce) in the cupboard then just use 4 tbsps of ordinary soy sauce. You can use left-over cooked rice for this, in which case you will need about 250-300g, and if it is cold when you start, the parcels will need an extra 5 minutes in the oven. These quantities are for two; you will need two pieces of tin foil about 65cm x 35cm for the parcels.

150g basmati rice
2 small cloves garlic
pinch of salt
1.5 tbsp toasted sesame oil
3.5 tbsp Kikkoman soy sauce
½ tbsp ketjap manis
5cm knob of garlic
1 green chilli
2 small pak choi (about 150g)
2 white fish fillets (about 300g total)

Preheat the oven to 230° C. Put the rice into a small pan, rinse under cold running water, drain and add enough water to come to the first joint of your index finger above the rice. Cover, bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes, when you should be able to hear that the water has been absorbed, there will be little holes in top of the rice and you won’t be able to see any water. Once it has reached this stage, turn off the heat and leave the pan covered on the cooling hotplate so that the rice absorbs the last of the moisture to give you dry, fluffy rice.

Trim the pak choi and slice across into three. Put into a steamer and blanch the stems for 2 minutes and the leaves for 1 minute. Run briefly under the cold tap to stop it cooking, and leave to drain. We find the pak choi tastier if it is cooked through, but you can omit this step if you like your veg a little crunchier.

Peel the cloves of garlic and crush with a pinch of salt. Whisk together with 1 tbsp of the sesame oil and the soy sauce(s). Peel and grate the ginger. Trim, deseed and slice the green chilli.

Lay out your two sheets of foil, and drizzle the remaining sesame oil over the centre of each. You can put both portions into one (slightly larger) parcel if you want to save foil, as we did today, though individual parcels are nicer, especially if you are cooking for guests. Sprinkle a quarter of the sliced chilli over each piece. Then divide the rice between the two parcels, fluffing up the grains with a fork if necessary. Add half the ginger and the pak choi.

Asian fish parcels 3

Then top with the fish fillets, the rest of the ginger (including any juice from grating it), and the rest of the sliced chilli. Finally, whisk the sauce again and pour it over.

Asian fish parcel 3

Fold the edges of the parcel and seal carefully, avoiding pulling the foil tight.

Place the parcels on a baking sheet and cook in the hot oven for 15 minutes (or 20 minutes if you have used cold cooked rice). If you make one larger parcel it will need an extra 2-3 minutes to cook. You can open a parcel and check that the fish is opaque through to the bottom of the thickest part of the fillet to be sure that it’s cooked through.

You can serve the parcels just as they are, but we find it easier to eat if you scoop the contents onto the plate – they slide out easily with the encouragement of a large serving spoon.  The rice absorbs the delicious flavours of the soy sauce and toasted sesame oil, and the fish stays beautifully moist – it is really delicious.

4 thoughts on “Asian fish parcels

  1. I love your innovation of photos for each stage of the preparation process. Great for a non-cook like me! And I love this recipe. Will try it this week.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Susannah we tried the recipe last night and loved it! All my favourite tastes particularly after the Christmas eating. Thank you so much for posting the recipe AND the very helpful photos. Nice to know what to aim for.

    Like

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