Beetroot Risotto

I have been meaning to try making beetroot risotto for some time, but what give me the final push was seeing a photo of a delicious-looking one made by my friend Steve, and then having it in the excellent restaurant Oliva in Rotterdam recently. There seem to be several different approaches: boiling or roasting the beetroot whole first, grating and chopping it, pureeing some or all of the beetroot or cooking it with the rice.

My recipe uses grated raw beetroot, which gives a good texture and has the bonus of cooking in about the same time as the rice and using only one pan (some recipes really should carry a washing-up warning). When I ate it in the restaurant, it was served with flakes of smoked trout, which was a great combination, so I served mine for supper with a fillet of smoked trout and a green salad. If you’re serving it on its own, you could top it with a handful of toasted walnuts or some diced blue cheese. I do recommend serving a salad alongside it, as the risotto is quite rich. Quantities serve 2 – I used 120g of rice, but if you are serving it on its own or are quite hungry I would use 150g rice and the larger quantity of stock.

25g butter
olive oil
1 shallot
1 clove garlic
175g beetroot (1 large or 2 small)
120-150g risotto
2 tbsp vermouth or white wine
450-600ml vegetable stock
30g parmesan
2 sprigs thyme

Heat the butter with a splash of olive oil in a wide saucepan. Peel and finely chop the shallot and garlic, and cook them gently in the butter and oil for a few minutes. Peel and coarsely grate the beetroot – using the grater attachment of the food processor is quickest and reduces the Lady-Macbeth-hands problem, but a box grater works fine (and is easier to wash up…). Heat the stock until just simmering or make up Marigold bouillon with boiling water (you could, of course, use chicken stock if you’re not vegetarian).

Tip the beetroot into the pan and stir for a couple of minute, so it starts to glisten. Now add the rice and cook for a minute until it starts to sound dry. Pour in the vermouth and stir vigorously. Then start adding the hot stock a ladleful at a time, stirring well with a wooden spoon, and waiting until it has been absorbed by the rice before you add the next ladleful.

In between stirring the risotto grate the parmesan and strip the thyme leaves off the stem. Add half the thyme leaves to the risotto. Now is also the time to wash the salad leaves and make a dressing for your green salad. After about 15-18 minutes most or all of the stock should have been incorporated, the beetroot be tender and the rice just al dente. When it is ready stir in three-quarters of the parmesan (and another knob of butter if you wish). Check the seasoning and serve with the remaining parmesan and thyme and your preferred toppings or accompaniments.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s