Eve’s pudding

img_2448I have always loved this traditional apple sponge pudding. The tangy, soft apples combine with the light sponge to form a delicious creamy layer where the two meet. It is a classic English pudding, comforting to eat but easier and quicker than many steamed puddings – and lighter too.

The first recipe I used was from the Revo Recipes cookbook  that came with the electric cooker my parents bought when they moved in to their first house (below, and see my post on rice pudding). Revo CookbookHowever, I have long used the recipe in Arabella Boxer’s recipe Sunday Times Cookbook (published in 1983), which has a lighter sponge and specifies butter rather than ‘fat’! Boxer suggested it as a pudding to follow Saddle of Lamb for an English lunch to serve to foreign visitors, since hot puddings like this are such a distinctive feature of British cooking (it is hard to type this without wincing in the current political climate).

I used to cook Eve’s pudding regularly when we had apple trees producing abundant crops of Bramley and (even better) Lane’s Prince Albert apples. Yesterday I cooked it for a dinner with friends and was surprised that some of them hadn’t come across it before, so thought it would be worth posting. It is a also a timely addition to one’s arsenal of comfort food to combat political angst – and remains an excellent choice when entertaining visitors of any nationality.

450g cooking apples
40g (1½ oz)sugar
85g (3oz) caster sugar
85g (3oz) butter at room temperature
115g (4oz) self-raising flour
2 eggs

Heat the oven to 175º C/Gas Mark 4 (I notice this is a bit lower than the 375º F specified in the Revo recipe and may experiment next time). Lightly butter an oven-dish that holds about a litre. Peel, core and slice the apples and put them in a pan with a little water and the 40g sugar (or to taste). Cook gently for about 15 minutes or until the apples are soft – this is important: having not made this in a while, I forgot and didn’t cook them quite long enough last night.

To prepare the sponge, cream the butter and sugar until soft and pale. Beat the eggs and add them to the mixture bit by bit alternately with the sifted flour – you can do this in a food processor or mixer, but it is perfectly easy to do by hand. Add a little milk if the mixture seems too firm.

If you’re entertaining, you can cook the apples, prepare the dish and cream the butter and sugar together in advance, then finish the sponge and pop it into the oven before you sit down to the main course (or the cheese if you are serving a cheese course before the pudding).

When the apples are ready turn them into the prepared dish, and spoon the sponge over to completely cover them. Bake for 30 minutes until well risen and golden brown. Serve hot with cream. And any left-overs are delicious eaten cold from the fridge in true Nigella style.

 

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